Religious Sites of Singapore (2017 update)

Singapore is truly a microcosm of all things Asian. Singaporean culture- from food, to language, to religion– is completely a product of the different migrations and settlements of people from China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, and more. One of the interesting aspects of this, from a tourism point of view, is that the religious sites are very diverse. In this land, there have been, for a long time, sizeable numbers of people following Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikh, Taoism, Christianity, and Judaism.

Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery

This Buddhist temple is quite a sight to behold! Built in the early 20th century and established as a formal monastery in 1921,  Kong Meng San Phor Kark See is a serene and beautiful home to many monks to this day. This is the heart of Singaporean Buddhism, and is certainly worth a visit. At  75,470 sq metres (nearly 11 football fields), this is the largest monastery in all of Singapore.

In face, the Burmese Buddhist Temple in Balestier is also visually stunning, and is known for its rare sort of psychedelic charm.

Sri Mariamman Hindu Temple

In Chinatown of all places is Singapore’s most beautiful and physically unique Hindu temple. The amazing architectural design brings many tourists to the temple, and it is also a national monument. It was founding in 1827. In fact, it is mostly famous because of its six-tiered tower at the entrance, which is very colourful and visually impressive. It features symbols representing Hindu deities, beasts, and mythological beings.

 Thian Hock Keng temple

This temple is a shrine for a Chinese Sea Goddess named Mazu. This temple was founded in 1837, and is extremely important for the Hokkien people. Indeed, the design is traditionally chinese, and it is build on a square grid. Confucius is also honor in this temple, as are several other Chinese mythological Gods and Goddesses. It is the most important, and most historic Hokkien temple in Singapore.

Masjid Sultan

Located in Kampong Glam, the Masjid Sultan is a beautiful mosque in the Rochan district. It is quite an impressive structure, and remains as the structural heart of the Muslim community in Singapore. After several smaller mosques had been build and deconstruct in Singapore ever since the early 19th century. This grand mosque was finally erect in 1928. Ever since, it has been an incredibly important landmark and place of worship for the Muslims of Singapore, and has been deemed a National Monument since 1975.


Conclusion

These examples are just some of the more grand and scenic examples of religious grounds in Singapore. If any of these religions, or another, is more suite to your specific interests, there will surely be some exciting opportunities to satisfy your curiosity!


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